Archive for professional development

webcast highlights: training and development in a recession

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , on January 28, 2009 by ruyoung

in a webcast from the canadian management centre, the message was loud and clear: do not have a pity party about the state of the economy – support your people and retrain. now is an opportunity to prepare for strong positioning during recovery.

our society tends to employ a fear cycle (media –> gossip –> fear –> less productivity–> workplace changes) which makes people fear the worst. the recommendation is to break it by investing in employees though effective and swift communications, fostering solidarity through innovation, and developing employees. someone referenced maslow’s hierarchy of needs in that if someone fears losing their job which could lead to losing their home, they aren’t going to rock the boat at work. people who are fearing their jobs think that they are the ones who might get the next pink slip. why tip the scales with a bold idea if they think their ideas aren’t welcome? eliminate that fear and welcome ideas. keep employess comfortable and eliminate turnover and fear mongering.  invest in the employees now for a greater return later. it will be the people on staff that bring us out of these economic times. the government merely sets the stage.

and i was particularly pleased to hear someone saythat training is a process, not an event. you cannot train someone and expect immeidate changes. entraining employees by setting the stage and allowe them to practice their new skills and apply them on the job. offer support and reinforcement along the way. check in with them to see how they are doing or what they may need.

now is an opportunity to prepare for strong positioning during recovery.

training and development in a recession

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on January 28, 2009 by ruyoung

in the midst of downsizing, layoffs, and stimulus packages the training industry needs a reminder of just how crucial the right kind of training is necessary to survive the current downturned economy.

the canadian management centre will host a free webcast titled training and development in a recession: what smart organizations do to survive in challenging times. 12:00pm to 1:00pm est.

the free webcast, promising prescriptive wisdom and proactive actions, will focus on:

  • Results of AMA and Ken Blanchard Company research on the effects of downsizing and the impact of training upon organization performance
  • “non-negotiable” skills/competencies that are critical to organization survival
  • Key insights into successfully managing through difficult change
  • Justifications for increased spending on training in lean times

though this is free, registration is required.

training and development in lean economic times

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , on January 21, 2009 by ruyoung

the canadian management centre announced today that they will be hosting a free webcast to address training in these lean economic times.

Training and Development in a Recession: what smart organizations do to survive in challenging times
Jan 28, 2009
12:00pm to 1:00pm EST

ken blanchard, scott blanchard, jim kirkpatrick, and edward t reilly will be poised to have a sincere conversation and q+a session to discuss the issues on every trainer’s mind.

What you’ll learn:

Join us for this energizing discussion which will focus on prescriptive wisdom and proactive actions, including:

  • Results of AMA and Ken Blanchard Company research on the effects of downsizing and the impact of training upon organization performance
  • “non-negotiable” skills/competencies that are critical to organization survival
  • Key insights into successfully managing through difficult change
  • Justifications for increased spending on training in lean times
  • And much more

this webcast is complimentary but registration are required. more info on the event listing.

professional development courses

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on December 17, 2008 by ruyoung

a few weeks back bschool.com posted a list of 100 free business and entrepreneurship courses from ivy league schools such as mit, columbia, and berkley. among them are:

these courses are a great place to start for general information, whether for professional development or to be well versed in various topics that may come up at the next neighbourhood mixer or an industry networking opportunity.

2008 bloggers choice awards

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 11, 2008 by ruyoung

i’ve been nominated for the 2008 bloggers choice awards in the education category.

if you’d like to vote for my blog as well, click on this badge:

My site was nominated for Best Education Blog!

what an honour – thank you veganbilly!

$5 for bike parts turns into teacher training

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , on July 18, 2008 by ruyoung

got five bucks to spare? someone in tajikistan could use a bike part.

i thought i’d collect $5 from as many people as possible in the next 2wks to see how much money i could raise to lend to kiva.org , where you could help rashid choriev raise money to purchase spare parts for bicycles to sell in his local market.

i looked through all of the entrepreneur profiles to choose one i thought was appropriate. i didn’t want to choose anything that involved food, general retail, perfumes, or plastics. instead i found rashid’s profile, who is helping to promote sustainable transportation.

the loan will be repaid through the international microloan fund with a repayment term of 12mos, repaid monthly. and what will i do with your money when it gets repaid to me? the funds that are repaid will be funnelled over to imagine1day.org to pay for teacher training, a charity that i mentioned back in apr.

your donation of $5 helps two organisations. would you consider giving today? here’s how:

cheques, money order, or well concealed cash to:
Rachel Young
2238 Dundas St W
PO Box 59072
Toronto, ON
M6R 3B5

paypal donation to:
ruyoung[at]gmail[dot]com

or catch me in person before aug 1.

comparing adult learners in knowledge-based economies

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on July 8, 2008 by ruyoung

a report from statistics canda contemplates the findings of a study of adult learners between canada, united states, norway, and switzerland.

each country reported nearly or more than 50% of the adult population enrolment in organised forms of adult learning during the year preceding the interview. most said it was for job-related reasons and a very small percentage had been engaged in adult learning for personal reasons.

“The dominance of work-related reasons for participating remains unchanged over a person’s entire working life. It is notable, for example, that close to 90% of Canadians with job tenure of more than 21 years who reported participating in an organized form of adult learning in 2002 did so for job-related reasons, a percentage that is similar to employees who had been in the job for between one and five years.

These results suggest that a large proportion of Canadians are active participants in what is now commonly referred to as the ‘knowledge-based economy’ and are ready to upgrade their skills in order to improve and/or maintain their prospects in the labour market. At the same time, it is becoming rare for Canadian adults to engage in organized learning activities primarily for personal reasons or study for the sake of study.”

it is also worth noting that more than 50% of interviewed learners from all four countries reported that they received financial support from their employer, however learners from the european countries were more still likely to engage in education and training even when unemployed compared to the north american learners interviewed.
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the report also contemplates the impact of job and workplace characteristics on adult learning as well as skills match-mismatch and participation in adult learning, but concludes that “it is worth noting that employer support for training favours high-skill workers in jobs with high skill requirements. That raises the question, then, of how best to create education and training opportunities for those in need of skills upgrading.”